The unredeemed captive

This Puritan family par excellence, and more than a hundred of their good neighbors, were now at the mercy of "savages" - and the fact that these "savages" were French-speaking converts to Catholicism made the reversal of the rightful order of things no less shocking. Two and a half years later, when Reverend Williams was released and returned to Boston amid much public rejoicing, Eunice remained behind - her Mohawk "master" unwilling to part with her. And so began a decades-long effort, alternately hopeful and demoralizing for her kin, to "redeem" her.

The unredeemed captive

As conditions of their production, these narratives are written by Puritans who have rejected the alien culture it's clear in The Unredeemed Captive just how alien the culture of the Kahnawake Indians 1 was to the early eighteenth century Puritans they captured, and that, at least, I suspect generalizes across the experiences of Puritan One of the things The Unredeemed Captive cemented for me is that my interest is in the phenomenon of Indian captivity, not the captivity narratives themselves.

The unredeemed captive

As conditions of their production, these narratives are written by Puritans who have rejected the alien culture it's clear in The Unredeemed Captive just how alien the culture of the Kahnawake Indians 1 was to the early eighteenth century Puritans they captured, and that, at least, I suspect generalizes across the experiences of Puritans taken captive by other tribes they have been exposed to and as such, they are invested in demonizing Indians and extolling the virtues of Puritans and Puritan culture.

Captivity narratives, in other words, are all about reinscribing the boundaries between cultures and reinscribing the hierarchical and moral judgments the Puritans made about cultures other than their own, and I find this project deeply, deeply unsympathetic. Yes, this is my own twenty-first century hierarchical and moral judgment about a culture other than my own.

The Puritans just infuriate me and nowhere more so than in their conviction of their own rightness. Puritanism is a strange mixture of self-righteousness and self-condemnation, and both of these characteristics make it particularly blind to the possibility of other cultures having anything valuable to offer.

This book is also, I think, an experiment, born out of John Demos's desire to rehabilitate narrative history.

Unredeemed Captive summary - Deerfield Massacre facts and analysis

As he says in the first line of the book, "Most of all, I wanted to tell a story. He wants to tell a story--in this case, the story of Eunice Williams, later named Marguerite, A'ongote, and Gannenstenhawi, who was captured by the Kahnawake Indians at the age of seven and who chose to remain with them all her life, despite the quite extraordinary efforts of her family, birth culture, and even the government of Massachusetts to "redeem" her.

The title of the book is a play on The Captive Redeemed, her father John Williams' account of his own captivity. In fact, the story Demos tells is the story of the failure to "redeem" her, as his principal primary sources are the writings of her father and of her brother Stephen.

He does his best to reconstruct the other side, but as a historian rather than a novelist, he is constrained by the circumstances of evidentiary survival.

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Not surprisingly, the two Puritan men both ministers and therefore of high status in their society both wrote more and had more of their writing preserved than either Puritan women or Indians of either sex.

Only one document ascribed to Eunice 2 remains, a letter to her brother, and since she could neither read, write, nor speak English as an adult, it is an intensely mediated document--and the fact that it is banal and personally unrevealing is really not surprising.

The unredeemed captive

Eunice Williams remains an absence at the center of the narrative. There are several things I wish Demos had done more explicitly. One is to address the issue of the historical record, what it means that we have one letter from Eunice and four thousand pages of typescript of her brother Stephen's diary.

Another is to talk at greater length and with great explicitness about the differences between Puritan and Kahnawake culture. He points out, for instance, that while male captives would generally go to any lengths to return to New England, female captives were overwhelmingly likely to stay and become Kahnawake, and to stay despite the fervent appeals of their male kinfolk.

And he addresses the surface issues of why that might be so. But he doesn't dig into it the way I wish he would have. And the third is to stop and explicitly deconstruct the idea of "captivity. She is adopted by the Kahnawake, converts to Catholicism, marries a Kahnawake man, lives and dies in Kahnawake, despite visits to Massachusetts and entreaties, blandishments, and actual bribes to remain.

The fact that her male relatives and the rest of her birth culture persisted in framing and describing the experience as "captivity" is in itself a matter that cries out for careful exegesis.

In other words, I suppose, while I appreciate Demos' desire and efforts to tell a story, I would have liked those efforts to be balanced by equal efforts to unpack and unpick the terms of the story he wants to tell.An Unredeemed Captive Chapter I Of the Settlement of Deerfield — John Eliot and the Indians — The Purchase of the Deerfield Grant from the Savages by Major Pynchon — The First Minister and the First Tavern.

The Unredeemed Captive by John Demos | regardbouddhiste.com

The Unredeemed captive The Unredeemed Captive, by John Demos, is a narrative story beginning on February 29, On this morning, the Colonial New England massacre took place resulting in about 48 casualties and about were taken into captivity and taken to New France (Canada).

Vaudreuil quietly approached the Indians with his offer and they accepted, writes Demos in his award-winning book, The Unredeemed Captive. On the night of Feb.

28, , a band of Abenaki and Mohawk Indians attacked Deerfield. Eunice Williams, also known as Marguerite Kanenstenhawi Arosen, (17 September – 26 November ) was an English colonist taken captive by French and Mohawk warriors from Deerfield, Massachusetts in Taken to Canada with more than other captives, the seven-year-old girl was adopted by a recently converted Mohawk family at Kahnawake and was fully assimilated into Mohawk Died: November 26, (aged 89), Kahnawake, Quebec, Canada.

The Unredeemed Captive - A Family Story by John Demos was about Eunice Williams’ captivity and the ordeal her family went through to try and get her to return home.

The Deerfield Raid

Eunice was captured together with her family and over other town residents in the Deerfield Massacre of The Paperback of the The Unredeemed Captive: A Family Story from Early America by John Demos at Barnes & Noble. FREE Shipping on $ or more! Specialists - 4/4(3).

The Unredeemed captive The Unredeemed Captive, by John Demos, is a narrative story beginning on February 29, On this morning, the Colonial New England massacre took place resulting in about 48 casualties and about were taken into captivity and taken to New France (Canada). The Unredeemed Captive was a brilliant attempt to pull together both an interesting story with many historical facts. I ultimately believe that Demo's main purpose in writing this piece was to write a story. In The Unredeemed Captive, John Demos, Yale historian and winner of the Bancroft Prize for his book Entertaining Satan, tells the story of the minister's captured daughter Eunice, who was seven years old at the time of the Deerfield incident and was adopted by a Mohawk family living at a Jesuit mission-fort near Montreal. Two and a half years 3/5(9).
Unredeemed Captive summary - Deerfield Massacre facts and analysis