Dignity and privacy in health care literature review

These practice examples are self-reported and have not been evaluated. Privacy and dignity - key points from policy and research Article 8 of the Human Rights Act gives the right to respect for private and family life, home and correspondence. Some hospital staff need additional training on the issues of dignity, respect and privacy. Older people prefer single-sex facilities Woolhead et al.

Dignity and privacy in health care literature review

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract Background Dignity has become a central concern in UK health policy in relation to older and vulnerable people.

The empirical and theoretical literature relating to dignity is extensive and as likely to confound and confuse as to clarify the meaning of dignity for nurses in practice. The aim of this paper is critically to examine the literature and to address the following questions: What does dignity mean?

What promotes and diminishes dignity? And how might dignity be operationalised in the care of older people? This paper critically reviews the theoretical and empirical literature relating to dignity and clarifies the meaning and implications of dignity in relation to the care of older people.

If nurses are to provide dignified care clarification is an essential first step.

Background

Methods This is a review article, critically examining papers reporting theoretical perspectives and empirical studies relating to dignity. The following databases were searched: An analytical approach was adopted to the publications reviewed, focusing on the objectives of the review.

Results and discussion We review a range of theoretical and empirical accounts of dignity and identify key dignity promoting factors evident in the literature, including staff attitudes and behaviour; environment; culture of care; and the performance of specific care activities.

Although there is scope to learn more about cultural aspects of dignity we know a good deal about dignity in care in general terms. Conclusion We argue that what is required is to provide sufficient support and education to help nurses understand dignity and adequate resources to operationalise dignity in their everyday practice.

Using the themes identified from our review we offer proposals for the direction of future research. Background In United Kingdom health policy there is much rhetoric about dignity.

Reports have highlighted ageism, care deficits and indignity in health and social care services [ 1 - 4 ]. Government responses have included, according to press reports, that every NHS hospital should have a 'dignity nurse' [ 5 ].

Reactions in the media were less than supportive of the initiative and it was described as "an insulting and cheap gimmick" [ 5 ].

The 'dignity nurse' proposal was abandoned in response to advice from senior nurses [ 6 ]. The policy documents and reports did not define dignity and the idea was used, for the most part, in a rhetorical manner and for dramatic effect.

Dignity factors - Privacy

Nevertheless, the emphasis placed on dignity means that it cannot be ignored as an issue for health care professionals. Dignity in care is for example one of three themes in the report "A New Ambition for Old Age" [ 7 ], which outlines the next steps in implementing the National Service Framework for Older People and which should therefore be an influential document in the future planning and management of service for older people.

Dignity is not, of course, a new idea. Philosophically it can be traced at least as far back as the writings of Aristotle.

Dignity and privacy in health care literature review

It has an established place in human rights discourse and within, for example, the philosophy of the hospice movement. The first statement in the preamble to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights refers to "recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family" http: In addition to increasing attention to indignity and policy responses, particularly in relation to the care of older people, there is a growing body of empirical and theoretical literature relating to dignity [ 8 - 16 ].

However, in spite of the wide-ranging body of literature relating to dignity, the common usage of the term seems more likely to confuse and confound than to clarify the meaning of dignity.Overview of selected research: What dignity means.

Despite being widely used and discussed, dignity has seemed a difficult term to pin down. It is often linked with respect from others and with privacy, autonomy and control, with self-respect and with a sense of who you are.

The health care systems in many high income countries will face substantial challenges in the near future: An increasing population of old people, a boost in the need for health care services, and fewer people to provide and finance the services.

In all of the articles studied in the present literature review, patients’ dignity and respect had been stated as the most frequent value indicated in 12 articles, equality and justice in 8 articles, and altruism and precise care and making appropriate relationships were indicated in 6 articles, respectively.

With the review commenting that maintaining privacy during toileting and continence care is vital to maintaing dignity. In addition that it was easier to maintain privacy in care homes that provided en-suite bathrooms for the residents.

Jul 11,  · Background. Dignity has become a central concern in UK health policy in relation to older and vulnerable people.

The empirical and theoretical literature relating to dignity is extensive and as likely to confound and confuse as to clarify the meaning of dignity for nurses in practice. health care providers; a lack of concern for privacy and general insensitivity for the needs of vulnerable older people.

Despite a wealth of literature, dignity remains a vague, ambiguous and highly.

Nursing ethical values and definitions: A literature review