A look at the spread of the bubonic plague in the fourteen century

Visit Website The Black Death was terrifyingly, indiscriminately contagious:

A look at the spread of the bubonic plague in the fourteen century

Web Resources Abstract In the fourteenth century, Europe suffered numerous catastrophes that would go down in history as "The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse"; a reference to the book of Revelation in which four great ordeals which Earth had to endure in its final days before judgement.

The Black Death stands out as the most dramatic and lifestyle changing event during this century. This was a widespread epidemic of the Bubonic Plague that passed from Asia and through Europe in the mid fourteenth century.

The Black Death, a medieval pandemic that was likely the bubonic plague, is generally associated with Europe. This is not surprising since it killed an estimated one-third of the European population in the 14th century. The plague in the fourteenth century was mainly the bubonic plague which became the pneumonic plague. To find out more why not look at: regardbouddhiste.com Bubonic plague did not spread on the victim’s lungs, but it. Study the medical aspects or look in-depth into the historical facts regarding the Bubonic plague, otherwise known as the Black Death. The Black Death swept through Europe and Asia during the fourteenth century, killing millions and leaving streets lined with corpses.

The first signs of the Black Plague in Europe were present around the fall of In the span of three years, the Black Death killed one third of all the people in Europe. This traumatic population change coming into the Late Middle Ages caused great changes in European culture and lifestyle.

Historical Background The Black Death was one of many catastrophes to occur following an increase in population during the High Middle Ages The population of Europe grew from 38 million to 74 million in this time.

Prior to the onset of the fourteenth century turmoil, Europe seemed to be in a state of growth in both agriculture and structure in society.

Cities began to rise with artisans, farmers, and other crafts people specializing in their own field of work. The daily life contact between European people in the cities and surrounding villages facilitated the spread of this disease, as people did not possess sufficient medical knowledge to prevent the spread of the disease with any great success.

The conditions in the cities also set the stage for disease. Waste accumulated in the streets for lack of sewer systems. Houses were crowded next to each other. One could not use the rivers for drinking water due to pollution.

With all of these conditions arising from the High Middle Ages, it was only a matter of time before the population was curbed by disaster. The cause of this sudden eruption of the plague is not exactly known. From the desert, it spread out in all directions.

Of most importance was the spread eastward to China. China suffered an emergence of bubonic plague during the early s.

During the expansion of trade during the Early and High Middle ages, trade routes with China were strengthened and ventured greatly. European traders, particularly those from the Italian city states, traveled the Black Sea region regularly.

Surviving documents show that one group of traders from Genoa arrived in Sicily In October offresh from a voyage to China. This was most likely the introduction of the plague to European lands.

Along with the Chinese goods on board, the traders carried the bacterium yersinia pestis in the rats on board as well as in some of the sailors themselves.

Black Death Begins

The Black Death had arrived in Europe. From Sicily, the plague spread at an alarming rate. The speed at which it spread and killed, as well as the horror which accompanied the diseased, caused a panic in the Italian population.

A look at the spread of the bubonic plague in the fourteen century

Families were forced to abandon members who were sick. Lawyers refused to form wills for the dying.The Black Death Europe in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries • Overview of Medieval Europe – Germanic/Asiatic invasions (’s’s CE).

This was a widespread epidemic of the Bubonic Plague that passed from Asia and through Europe in the mid fourteenth century. The first signs of the Black Plague in Europe were present around the fall of In the span of three years, the Black Death killed one third of all the people in Europe.

the plague spread at an alarming rate. . In England, the phrase "Black Death" is first used to refer to the 14th-century epidemic in Writers contemporary with the plague described the event as "great plague" [65] or "great pestilence". Bubonic plague is mainly spread by infected fleas from small animals.

It may also result from exposure to the body fluids from a dead plague-infected animal. [5] In the bubonic form of plague, the bacteria enter through the skin through a flea bite and travel via the lymphatic vessels to a .

Fowler, Gillian R., "Moving the Plague: the Movement of People and the Spread of Bubonic Plague in Fourteenth Century through Eighteenth Century Europe" (). Honors Theses. A HISTORY OF THE PLAGUE. By Tim Lambert. Early Plague. In the 6th century AD bubonic plague struck and killed millions. In AD it struck the Byzantine Empire and it soon spread to other parts of Europe.

The 6th century plague may have killed 25% of the population. It certainly claimed the lives of millions.

Anatomy of 14th Century Bubonic Plague Hazmat Suits | Mental Floss